Locums for a Small World Blog

Top 5 U.S. states to work locum tenens jobs

Posted by Kari Redfield

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Explore the country, contributing your valuable medical skills where they’re most needed — while earning good money. That’s all possible with locum tenens. Right now, we have openings all across the U.S.

Some physicians choose to do locum tenens full-time, in order to gain work/life balance, spend time with family, and choose their own hours. Other physicians take on occasional locums work in order to travel to their bucket list destinations. Isn’t it time that you did something for yourself? Went someplace new? Tried something different?

Why not line up an assignment — and explore while you’re there? Oh, and did we mention the perks? In most cases, we pay for your airline flights, housing, and malpractice insurance. We’ll help you through the licensing and credentialing processes. Plus, wherever you go, you’ll be adding to your CV while helping people where you’re needed and appreciated.

Not sure where to go? Here are the five top states to explore:

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  1. California: Sea to mountains, city to country, and everything in between!

One of our regular locums physicians likes to visit Santa Barbara in order to take on some locum tenens shifts, to see friends, and to enjoy the sights and food. Many other locum tenens doctors choose to take assignments in iconic California, too. And why not? In California, you can explore wine country; walk through Hollywood; and visit Yosemite, the Redwoods, Joshua Tree, Lake Tahoe, and all of the other wild wonders. From city life to remote mountains to beautiful beachside sunsets to all kinds of entertainment, California has variety and splendor for everyone.

Ready to go on your own Californian adventure and get paid for it? Contact us today, as a permanent California license takes about 16 weeks to secure. We’ll help you through it, and typically cover the cost.

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  1. Massachusetts: History, beer, sports, water — and more!

There’s so much to do in Massachusetts, from the famous Massachusetts Whale Trail — which links nearly 40 museums, attractions, whale watching excursions, historic sites, and tours — to the legendary sites in Boston, to a replica of the original Mayflower boat, to the wonders of Cape Cod and Nantucket. And there’s crabbing, clamming, fishing — and so much more! Food, brew pubs, arts, theater, sports, and many activities captivate tourists and locals alike.

Western Massachusetts is beautiful, full of lush green hills in the Berkshires, to the dazzling foliage along the Mohawk Trail, America’s first scenic road drive (and yes, you can hike through the forest there, too). Hike and bike this side of the state — or go on a local food tour via the quant bed-and-breakfasts and spas.

Oh, and who wouldn’t want to enjoy New England’s dazzling colors in fall? And don’t forget the 14,000 acres of active cranberry bogs. 

Sound fun? Get started, as generally, licensing takes 16 weeks, so contact us today if you’re interested, and we’ll help you through the process.

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  1. North Carolina: Mountains, valleys, and sea

North Carolina has mountains, valleys, and miles of seashore. Whether you’re looking for an urban retreat, or something off the beaten path for all kinds of recreational adventure (from fishing, hot air ballooning, sky diving, hiking, biking, skiing, golf, rock climbing, and more), you can find it in North Carolina. Visit eclectic cafes and breweries, moonshine distilleries, vineyards, historic landmarks, museums about the Wright brothers and their famous Kitty Hawk and so many other historical eras — and lots more.

As the locals say, “North Carolina has long been associated with sweet tea, NASCAR and the Duke-Chapel Hill basketball rivalry.” All true, but there’s much more too.

Licensing takes about six weeks, so get started with us today.

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  1. Minnesota: They call it ‘Minnesota nice’ for a reason

Minnesota boasts more than 10,000 natural glacial lakes and is perhaps the origins of politeness, with down-to-Earth people who know how to work hard and express their gratitude. If you like nature, water, and water sports (from top-notch fishing lakes to water skiing), then be sure to visit. With so many lakes and rivers, Minnesota has more miles of shoreline than California, Florida, and Hawaii combined.

The Twin Cities (the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area) features culture galore, including numerous museums, more than 120 theater companies, tons of local music, and good food. With so many parks and green space, you can bike from one side of Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area to the other on bike paths with nary leaving greenspace.

Southwestern Minnesota features prairie land, quiet spaces, and simple, uber affordable living. Northern Minnesota, is the land of lakes and forests, with Duluth acting as the gateway to Lake Superior, which is so big that all the other Great Lakes combined could fit into it, with waves sometimes as tall as 40 feet.

Licensing in Minnesota can take about six weeks, so reach out to us today!

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  1. Michigan: The Great Lake State, industry central, and Motown

From Mackinac Island, where no cars are allowed, to the origins of American industry, to jumping off into adventure on any of the four Great Lakes, Michigan has a lot to offer. Uniquely, no matter where you are in Michigan, you’re always within 85 miles of one of the Great Lakes’ shorelines. The Upper Peninsula is known for rugged living, splendid wildlife, numerous lakes, and nature. It’s a must-see at least once in a lifetime and the perfect spot for any type of outdoor adventure. In the Lower Peninsula, visit museums to see the birthplace of modern industry, explore the roots of Motown, dine on fine or fun food, see live music, and go to festivals, farmers markets, and more.

As the locals say it, “Whether you are an urban adventurer or an outdoor enthusiast, a foodie or a thrill-seeker, traveling with your family or making memories with friends — you are on the brink of planning a vacation so unique, it can only be classified as Pure Michigan.”

Plan around six weeks to get your license. Contact us today!

Get started on your adventure

Ready to explore your own locum tenens adventure? Ready to treat yourself to some travel? Click the button below to browse our current openings, or give us a call at 1.800.760.3174.

Search our current physician opportunities

Topics: benefits of locum tenens, locum tenens lifestyle, travel, Locum Tenens, work life balance, United States, michigan, California, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Minnesota

How this doctor uses locum tenens to give back to the world and take control of her destiny

Posted by Kari Redfield

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Dr. Anita Haugabrook (Doc Nita) first got into locum tenens during a transitional point in her career. She had just left a fulltime partner role in a physician group and wanted some time to consider options before signing a long-term contract. However, she soon fell in love with the locum tenens way of life and decided to make it permanent.

“Transitioning to the world of locums was a leap of faith. Thanks to Global Medical Staffing and my consultant, Sydnee Shelton, for making my dreams a reality!” Doc Nita says.

What Doc Nita loves is the way locum tenens allows her to passionately practice medicine, regain work/life balance, and travel to new places.

“I choose my shifts and locations, which provides me autonomy and allows me to spend more time with my family. Now, I’m back in control of my life and my destiny,” she says.

Flexibility and work/life balance
Doc Nita loves the flexibility of locum tenens and her ability to set her own schedule. “I only accept the times and places I want to work,” she says. “I literally work when I want to and don’t work when I don’t want to.”

For her, that means no nights or weekends.

With the ability to be in charge of your own schedule comes true work/life balance. That, in turn, means Doc Nita has fallen back in love with medicine after feeling burned out for years.

Helping patients
With locum tenens, instead of spending so much time handling staffing crisis and admin tasks, she can spend much of her working time doing what she loves: helping patients.

“I get to practice medicine,” she says with a smile. “When I was burned out, I wasn’t able to see the joy in my work anymore, and I went into medicine to make a difference, to get people well, and to see the joy in people when they’re feeling better. I feel like I’m helping people again.”

She loves practicing in different healthcare settings — and she loves that she can choose not to go back to a certain hospital or healthcare facility if she didn’t like the way it was managed.

Also, she says that now instead of bearing the brunt of the problems, she’s on the receiving end of gratitude.

“Almost every time I leave a shift someone tells me ‘thank you’ because they were going to be overworked without me there. I really feel the appreciation as a locum tenens physician filling in their gaps.”

Anita blog 2One of my favorite things about locums (travel medicine) is meeting and working with new people all the time! Meet my APC team at UVMC and a couple of photobombers.

Giving back
The flexibility of locum tenens has made it easier for Doc Nita to do medical mission work. So far, since she started locum tenens in August 2017, she has helped out in Panama and Costa Rica.

“The missions were eye opening and rewarding,” she shares. “I don’t complain anymore about anything in my life because of it. The people we helped would walk six miles each way to see us. They would leave the day before just so they could see us!”

Sydnee, Doc Nita’s recruiter at GMS, shares in on the joy of witnessing someone so willingly helping others.

“Doc Nita’s passion to help those who otherwise wouldn’t receive medical assistance is unparalleled,” says Sydnee. “When she shares the stories of her time abroad, she oozes with love and passion for the people she served. She speaks of how much these beautiful people have changed her view on life.”

Doc Nita adds, “I look forward to my next mission!”

Living somewhere else like a local
So far, Doc Nita has taken travel assignments in St. Louis, Missouri, and Northern California.

The way locums works is that Global Medical Staffing arranges the travel to the location. The contract also includes medical malpractice insurance and usually housing and transportation as well, with GMS taking care of the logistics, including helping with credentialing, licensing, and privileging before the assignment starts.

When on assignment, Doc Nita makes sure to take time from work to take in the local sights.

“Missouri was a good experience,” she recalls. “I worked with a physician group that was in between management teams, and it was really neat to come to help a solid group of people who had been there for a while but also were in flux. It was a well-run group. And St. Louis was a pretty neat town. It was nice visiting there and learning more about it, seeing the Arches, going to Sweetie Pie’s Restaurant for soul food, and checking out other local places.”

Doc Nita’s next traveling assignment was in Ukiah, California. “The drive to work every day is amazing because it is so beautiful!” she says. “The local culture and tribal people are amazing. The transplants are too — it’s kind of a little melting pot. I tried some local food and wine and then went to the farmers market with all of its local teas. My goal every time I go somewhere is to absorb some of the culture.”

Anita blog 4The City of Ten Thousand Buddhas — the largest Buddhist monastery in western society. Travel opportunities are of a hallmark of locum tenens. Where would you like to visit on your next assignment? Let GMS help you get there!

Choose your assignments
Finding the right assignments involves teamwork. As Sydnee puts it, “I partner with Dr. Haugabrook rather than ‘work’ with her. She has made me an equal and has so much trust in me. Her trust in me is at times intimidating and humbling! She has said to me on more than one occasion regarding her transition from her permanent job to locums, ‘Syd, you are a Godsend!’ However, I feel it is the other way around!”

This type of mutually respectful and heartfelt relationship is common between our GMS recruiters and physicians. We want to find you the right assignment that works out for your goals, needs, aspirations, and wanderlust.

Still unsure? Give it a try, says Doc Nita. “You can always try it and then go back to full time if you want. For me, I love locums and am not going back.”

Doc Nita recently took over our Instagram to share her locum tenens adventure in Ukiah, California. Head over to our page to check out her photos right here.

Want to start your own locum tenens adventure? Click the button below to browse our current opportunities. Or just pick up the phone and give us a call.

Search our current physician opportunities

Topics: benefits of locum tenens, locum tenens lifestyle, travel, California, Northern California

Considering locum tenens? Discover the 7 best places to practice medicine in the U.S.

Posted by Everett Fitch

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Where you travel in the U.S. largely depends on what types of destinations you’re attracted to. It goes without saying that If you’re a beach-lover then you'll head to one of the coasts. If you have an affinity for the desert then you'll try the southwest; it will most certainly fascinate you. Are you in search of mountains? Then you'll want to venture toward Colorado, the Rockies. Do you yearn for great lake scenery? Then Minnesota will be your next stop on the list. Of course if you’re looking for that thick green forest then the Pacific Northwest is always a welcoming haven.

What’s our point? If your heart desires a specific landscape then there’s no reason for you as a locum tenens doctor to not seek out these types of locations. Still there’s more to choosing an assignment than just the scenery. There are other factors you should consider like: What city should I practice in and why? What kind of compensation will I receive? What is the cost of living? Will this assignment turn from temporary to permanent if I end up liking it?

These are all pertinent questions that the following blog will address. (And if not then you can always request more information from us.) In fact, Medscape puts out a yearly review of Best and Worst Places to Practice exactly with these kinds of things in mind. So if you’re new to locum tenens then you should consider reading their 2016 list. Otherwise we’ll fill you in on our own seven favorite locations to practice medicine in the U.S. Discover all of them below (in no particular order).

Minnesota

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The Midwest is grossly underestimated. Take Minnesota: sure the winters can be tough but not so tough that you can’t see the beauty in the frozen tundra still. No worries though. The summers here are amazing. There are lakes and beaches galore. Plus for those doctors seeking a good career path anywhere near the big cities – like Minneapolis for example – you’ll find excellent compensation plus low malpractice payouts according to Medscape’s 2016 article. What else will you find? Great health industry employers like the Mayo Clinic, UnitedHealth Group and St. Jude Medical to name a few.

Ohio

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Again, harkening back to our last point, the Midwest is underrated. Most people think of the cold, oncoming winter when it comes to this region of the U.S. Rarely do people see the allure of the Great Lakes nearby and the countless state parks like Hocking Hills State Park which houses Old Man’s Cave, Ash Cave and Cedar Falls.

Still the bigger cities in Ohio hold more allure than you think. Columbus, for one, has an affordable cost of living plus great job opportunities. Medscape states “Ohio’s physician density hovers slightly above the national average (279.8 vs. 265.5 per 100,000 population).”

New Hampshire

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Now on to the East Coast where every season glistens in its own unique way. The White Mountains in New Hampshire hold more spring, summer and autumn mystery to the uninitiated than any other state on the eastern seaboard, so explore away. In other words you’re in for a treat if you vacation in these parts.

What else is great here? Medscape’s article states, “New Hampshire is the only Northeastern state to make Medscape’s top 10 in terms of compensation. Plus the cost of living here is the second lowest in the Northeast.

Pennsylvania

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Pennsylvania is smack dab in between the Midwest and the East Coast. It’s considered a northeastern state no doubt. Still you’ll get an eclectic mix of mountain and plains scenery in this portion of the United States.

In addition to that, the cost of living in places like Pittsburgh are very reasonable. In fact it’s, “half that of DC or San Francisco according to the AIER (American Institute for Economic Research).”

California

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It’s almost common knowledge nowadays that living along the coast of California is a tad more expensive than living in many other parts of the U.S., specifically in the Bay Area. Though, there are some cities that are slightly south of San Francisco that offer not only peace of mind in the form of adventuring through state parks and beaches but also in the abundance of assignments offered. You’re able to see the wonders of every bit of California all while supplementing your income with frequent opportunities.

Oregon

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Ah, the gritty elegance of the Pacific Northwest, what else do you need? If your assignment is in Portland, Oregon you’ve got pretty much everything you ever wanted. There are waterfall trails (Multnomah Falls) and mist-filled beaches (Cannon Beach) nearby, plus tons of local culture as well as a great restaurant scene.

Don’t let the higher cost of living bother you while working in Portland, the quality of life is still there. Again, Medscape’s 2016 review reports that, “Oregon’s economy has grown nearly three times faster than the national economy since 2001, and the Portland metro area, which accounts for three quarters of the state’s economy is the main driver.”

Arizona

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The Grand Canyon, Saguaro National Park, Petrified Forest, need we name off more amazing sights to convince you to practice medicine in Arizona? Of course we don’t. We know it’s not all about the national parks. You need more to tempt you than that.

Even though the bigger cities here do attract more physicians – the Phoenix-Scottsdale area to name one – the state still has lower physician density than the national average (234.0 per 100,000 to the nation’s 265.5 per 100,000). Never mind any of that if you’re a golfer, this state is replete with gorgeous golf courses.

There are a lot of factors to consider when taking a locum tenens assignment in the U.S. Luckily we have locum tenens experts here to help guide you in your search for a new opportunity. Are you up for a new 2017 locum tenens adventure this summer? Click the orange button below to discover all the best places to practice medicine in the U.S.

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Topics: Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, California, Oregon, Arizona, New Hampshire, Medscape, best places to practice medicine, Locum Tenens

The winter bucket list for locum tenens doctors who double as photographers – U.S. edition

Posted by Everett Fitch

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In the thick of winter it’s easy to stay inside after a long day at work. It can get pretty darn cold outside after all. If the choice is to either stay inside with a hot cup of cocoa or layer up and head outside for a brisk winter walk, most will opt for the hot chocolate. But getting your heart pumping and a burn going on in your calves is good for you.

Try a winter hike up in the mountains. If you don’t have mountains nearby then go for a winter walk around your neighborhood, or a winter stroll through the city. To partake in such a meditative activity is to feed your mind and body with new stimuli. You’re able to see your surroundings in a new light outside the familiar routes you take. It may even change your perspective a little regarding the coldest season of the year, too.

While you’re at it bring your camera along on your trek. It doesn’t matter if you’re a novice or an expert, all you need is your unique, artistic eye and a touch of enthusiasm. Are you completely new to photography? Do you want something with a little more pixel power than what your smart phone can offer? Then check out our recent blog about the best digital cameras of 2016.

For those already armed and ready with your cameras we’ve compiled a winter bucket list of photography hotspots across the U.S. – from national parks to iconic cities. It’s time to trade in those awe-inducing summer photos that so often invade our social media feeds and replace them with wintry wonder.

Denali National Park, Alaska

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Alaska doesn’t see much light during winter. But that doesn’t mean you can't still enjoy the landscape. Denali hosts some of the most dazzling winter scenery in the whole world. Not just on the ground, either, but up in the sky, too. The northern lights dance and dazzle miles above the Earth. Though this hypnotic phenomena can be fleeting if not periodic so be sure to have your camera handy.

To learn more about activities like dog sledding, cross-country skiing and stargazing check out the National Park Service. Oh and remember to bundle up. Temperatures can drop to -40 F. It’s always a good idea to let someone know when and where you’re going as well.

Sequoia National Park, California

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Those same tall, red, towering trees you see during the summer are still there in winter – except now they’re more vivid, more commanding and proudly alive in their space. The pure whiteness of the snow gives these trees even more arresting color.

Immerse yourself in the silence of these sequoias by snowshoeing or cross-country skiing (with camera at the ready of course). Check out this handy guide to learn more about some of the activities you can partake in during winter. Depending on how much time you have – from a few hours to a week or more – you can go for a hike in Giant Forest, go sledding at Big Stump or take a long, arduous (but rewarding) journey to Pear Lake Winter Hut and camp overnight. Be sure to reserve the hut in advance.

New York City, New York

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New York City is never short of inspiration. It serves as a muse for many photographers with its iconic architecture (e.g., Flatiron, Chrysler, Woolworth, Empire State, Brooklyn Bridge).

There aren’t many hiking trails in town but what it lacks in that department it more than makes up for in its stunning succession of skyscrapers on almost every street. (In fact, Kurt Vonnegut once called NYC “Skyscraper National Park” in his novel Slapstick.) You’ll have a hard time pulling your finger off the shutter no matter if you’re in Times Square or Central Park. Just remember that the winter wind can be bone chilling in NYC, so grab your warmest jacket.

What else is there to do? Take a photographer’s stroll (that means leisurely) from Manhattan to Brooklyn along the eponymous bridge’s walkway.

Salt Lake City, Utah

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We couldn’t think of a more fitting city for you to visit during winter than our very own (other than NYC). We’ve got national and state parks galore that are a stone’s throw away. Plus Salt Lake City serves as the perfect basecamp for skiing and snowboarding – seeing as how Snowbird, Alta, Brighton and Solitude are about thirty minutes from downtown. Don’t forget about the abundance of hiking trails up Big Cottonwood Canyon, Little Cottonwood Canyon and Millcreek Canyon, too.

Still there’s more to this cross-section of Utah than the great outdoors: plan a night out on the town and see the Temple Square lights, go ice skating at Gallivan Center or simply stroll around downtown with your camera in hand and capture the wonderful architecture.

Don’t you think it’s about time that winter got as much photography love as the rest of the seasons? With all these bucket list winter trips don’t forget to bring your trusty camera along with you.

Throw your hot chocolate in a thermos and head outside. Capture all the idyllic snow-blanketed scenery that you can. And enjoy the cold as much as humanly possible. Get your layers on then see what locum tenens assignments are available across the U.S. right now with the click of a button below.

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Topics: winter, bucket list, photography, photographer, Alaska, California, New York, Utah, Salt Lake City, New York City, Sequoia National Park, Denali National Park

And now 9 offbeat, extraordinary things to see and do in California

Posted by Everett Fitch

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We’ve written about California a lot – and for good reason. It’s a marvelous bit of land. You’ve got the redwoods in the north standing tall next to gorgeous oceanside cliffs. Turn south and both those mammoth trees and the misty monoliths along with them quickly and dramatically turn into gold-sand beaches. Inland, Yosemite casts massive shadows (you’ll immediately fall in love with this wilderness). Then there’s Lake Tahoe nearby where – during any season – the beauty is endless and unerring. Vibrant cultures and communities fringe every last measure of road along the way.

Immensely captivating places like Big Sur provide beatnik refuge. Coastal cities like San Diego, farther south, make you feel like you’re on perpetual spring break. And only a glimmer, a scratch-of-the-surface, is what we’ve offered so far. We know there’s so much more to the Golden State.

This time though, instead of going the more familiar route (like a listing of top places to explore in California), we’re going to give you a full list of the not-so-familiar. Places or things or experiences you may have never even heard of. Have we intrigued you? Are you planning a locum tenens adventure in California? If you answered yes to at least one of those questions, keep reading.

1) The Wave Organ in San Francisco

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Back in 1986 a pair of artists, Peter Richards and George Gonzales, collaborated on an acoustic art piece together. It’s called the Wave Organ and it actually produces sounds, activated by waves of course. (It’s said that the sound is so subtle that you must become sensitized to really hear it.) Go check it out. You may just fall in love with the views of the Golden Gate Bridge from here, too.

2) Forestiere Underground Gardens in Fresno

Search for this place online and you’ll find that its main website may look a little out of date. Don’t let that deter you. It’s spectacular here. The active slogan on said website definitely rings true: Take a Subterranean Journey to the Mediterranean – in the Middle of California. Interestingly enough, the man who built these underground gardens was a Sicilian immigrant named Baldassare Forestiere (what a name, huh?).

3) The sailing stones of Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park

If you can stand the heat, this is a most amazing sight. Not simply for its vast playa filled with polygonal mud cracks but also for its sailing stones. These stones, both big and small, baffled scientists for years. Why? These rocks would leave large, long tracks with no seeming explanation as to how they were moving. Scientists later found out that ice flows and strong winter winds were the culprits.

4) Shark Fin Cove just northwest of Santa Cruz

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The views you’ll find here are utterly dreamlike. There’s an actual rock that juts out of the water here that resembles a shark fin. You may have never heard of this place yet because it’s located just off the side of the road alongside a small makeshift parking lot. Don’t let that fool you. A short walk from the parking lot, you’ll see unbelievable views. And down below, in addition to the shark fin rock, there’s a large sea cave ripe for exploring (be careful of rising water).

5) The Giant Dipper in Santa Cruz

Hey, once you’re done at Shark Fin Cove, you might as well stop by the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, right? Right? For sure, this place is a better known site but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth visiting still. We don’t think a trip to this section of California would be complete without taking a ride on the iconic Giant Dipper.

6) Castello di Amorosa near Calistoga

You don't often think Tuscan castle when you think of California but for real, there's an "authentically-built, 13th-century Tuscan castle and winery" here. Now the place wasn’t actually built in the 13th century but it does have all the makings of a castle from that time period – even a torture chamber. You’re welcome to visit for a tasting or take a guided tour, or both.

7) The fire fall at Horsetail Fall in Yosemite

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Sadly, you’ll have to wait until next February to view this fiery phenomenon. Specifically, it’s the last two weeks of February when you’ll want to visit. Horsetail Fall itself is seasonal, flowing solely in winter and early spring. But, like we said, if you visit in late February you’ll catch views absolutely unparalleled. The light at sunset during this time of season hits Horsetail just right and reflects so magnificently it looks as if the waterfall is on fire.

8) Sunny Jim’s Cave in La Jolla


While there is a string of seven sea caves in La Jolla, Sunny Jim is the only one that is accessible by land. It wasn’t originally though. Not until a tunnel was dug in 1903 to access the back of Sunny Jim. Believe it or not, the name itself comes from a cartoon character for a cereal that made its debut in the early 20th century. Force Cereal Malt Flakes, look it up. Check out the wonderful cave, too.

9) Malibu Wine Safari in yep, Malibu


A safari in Malibu? We’re sold already. Explore almost all thousand acres of Saddlerock Ranch from the comfort of a "custom-built open-air Safari vehicle." About 30 minutes from Los Angeles you can taste fine local wine all while taking in resplendent scenery and rubbing shoulders with Hollywood elite. Well not exactly. They’re retired now from the big screen…and they’re animals, but they are exotic (zebras, camels, giraffes, etc.)

Now it’s time to plan a trip to California, don’t you think? Again, we’ve only scratched the surface. In fact, here’s a whole list of more obscure, unusual and fascinating places to visit. Go on, check it out. Oh, and if you’re looking to practice in California soon, you can find both short-term and longer-term locum tenens openings here by clicking the button below.

Search current physician openings in California

Topics: California, Northern California, Southern California, Central Valley, Offbeat, Wave Organ, Shark Fin Cove, Giant Dipper, Forestiere Underground Gardens, Castello di Amorosa, Sunny Jim's Cave, Racetrack Playa, Horsetail Fall

Global Medical's top 10 states for locum tenens doctors to explore in 2015 (pt. 1)

Posted by Everett Fitch

top 10 states to explore in 2015
The U.S. is a beautiful, electrified land: east to west, too-tall mountains storm onto too-long plains and then disappear into too-big coast. Each state is respectively remarkable. (They all have their own landscape, their own character, even their own energy.) Part one of Global Medical’s two-part "Top 10 States to Explore" series highlights some of the most remarkable states in the union. Read on and be inspired.

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#10 Virginia: America's beautiful battleground and gateway to the South

Powerful Native American nations lived off the land now known as Virginia for centuries. English settlers then came and established their first permanent colony in 1607 giving birth to a new way of life in the New World.

You could say Virginia is old—because it is. Its age shows even in its nicknames (e.g., Old Dominion and the Mother of States). It’s not ashamed though. This state is proud to show its hard-fought scars. It’s been a battleground for many violent paradigm shifts throughout American history (think the Revolutionary War and the Civil Rights movement). So we look to VA and what we find wrapped up in its 42,774.2 square miles is an abundance of wisdom, beauty and character.

On the state's eastern coast you can bet there are a slew of great places to explore. Like Ferry Farm—on the banks of the gorgeous Rappahannock River—where you can visit the house George Washington grew up in. Or take to the Grapes and Grains Trail: you'll come across four wineries, a brewery, a distillery and tons of jaw-dropping scenery along the way. Oh, and if you run out of things to do (which you won't), Washington D.C. isn’t far off.

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Farther in-state you can road-trip on the Blue Ridge Parkway; kayak the Upper James River; drink and dance at the Blue Ridge Blues and BBQ festival; or cruise into the famous orange-hued Virginia sunset on Smith Mountain Lake. There's Shenandoah National Park, too, with 196,000 acres of trails, caves and rivers.

Life moves pretty fast. It's important to slow down and take a deep breath every once in a while. Luckily that's not hard to do in Virginia. Come breathe in rich colonial towns (think Jamestowne), golden mountain communities (think Roanoke), silvery coastal cities (think Virginia Beach) and the most happening capital city in the South (Richmond). Take time to experience everything the Mother of States has to offer.

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#9 Oregon: World-famous wine, craggy coastline and America's most European city

Try as you might you won't find another place like Oregon. In the south of the state there's this incredibly blue body of water high up on a mountaintop: It's called Crater Lake and it's the deepest lake in the United States. Make it to the top and you've got 2,000-foot-high views with nothing but infinite old-growth forest and rivers in every direction. Oh, and have you ever heard of a cliff-top lighthouse called Heceta Head? No? Drive north along the coast to catch it. Whale watching is probably at its finest here.

Keep heading north for a while and you'll start seeing massive rocks jutting out of the ocean at Cannon Beach. This place is much more than mist and monoliths though, it also doubles as an artistic town. Change course east with a slight southward bent and you'll arrive at Multnomah Falls—a grand waterfall that fringes the Historic Columbia River Highway. Then there's Mount Hood southeast of that (Portland's eye candy and Oregon's resort hotspot), Smith Rock southeast of that (a towering rock notorious to climbers everywhere), and the Painted Hills a tad east of that (a sea of multi-colored mountains). Make sure you check out all of Oregon's wonders.

Next to all these peaks and waterfalls and lighthouses you'll find farmers' markets, wineries and breweries with the freshest produce, the choicest of Pinot Noir and the frothiest of ales. And these places are only a few short hours from awesome cities and towns.

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What about Portland? How can we forget the Rose City (named for its three stunning rose gardens plus the Annual Rose Festival)? The city that's been described as America's most European? The city that comes to mind whenever you think Oregon? If a pretty magazine is your only source for choosing travel destinations, you probably won't visit this riverside city. Because as gorgeous as it is, as cultured as it is, as downright everything-you’ve-ever-wanted-in-a-city as it is, you won’t find it bookmarked in some glossy brochure: you’ll hear about it from outdoorsmen, foodies, artists, explorers of all types, and now us. Here's a litany of things to do in Portland.

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#8 Florida: There's no getting away with being uninspired in this inspiring land

Break your routine and try something new. Try Florida. A place with ineffable beaches and bogs; with waves that flit and sparkle; and with cities that dance and shine. Keep in mind, blue skies and pristine beaches are just the beginning of what makes the Sunshine State a can't-miss.

Northern Florida, for example, is replete with diversity. What with its oak-canopied Tallahassee, its raucous-nightlife-having Panama City, its river-city-by-the-sea Jacksonville, its food-with-a-Cajun-flair Gainesville, and its relax-in-the-morning-surf-in-the-afternoon Pensacola—there's no getting away with being uninspired in this inspiring land.

Jump way southeast and you’re in the thick of striking scenery—Port St. Lucie. Residents and tourists have long referred to this stretch of Florida as the Treasure Coast. Spend any time here and you'll agree the name is fitting. The waters offer up awe-inspiring marine life and a fishing scene second to none. Back on dry land, you'll find beachside boardwalks and farmers' markets galore. And with over 250 days of sunshine each year, how could you not treasure a place like this?

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Farther south you'll find a sparkling city. It doesn't matter where you grew up, you've heard of Miami. In fact, you probably have an indelible composition of the city's colors in your head: green, blue, gold and every imaginable shade between. You'd be right to conjure that up. But if you go beyond the pretty images, you'll see a city with colors that don't register on any spectrum. We won't fault you for being blissfully unaware. Come see all the colorful music, dance, theatre, film, art and nightlife going on behind the scenes.

It's not too often you can say a single place has it all. It turns out that's exactly what we found in Florida. Everything.

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#7 Massachusetts: Imbibe in a state made of greatness

Massachusetts is great for so many reasons. Let’s start with reason number one, Boston. Four centuries of iron-hearted American history radiate through this town. It’s a proud city and it shows everywhere. It's not called the Cradle of Liberty…the Athens of America…the Hub of the Universe for no reason. It’s because cultural and political revolutions were born here. It’s because colonial and cutting-edge architecture is housed here. It’s because cream-of-the-crop colleges and universities drive the world ever-forward. It’s because top-notch seafood is served, sports history is made, avant-garde art and music is created, and the most epic showing of Independence Day is echoed across New England.

Southeast of the Hub you’ll find Cape Cod and the Islands (AKA reason number two Massachusetts is great). You get all kinds of culture, adventure and cuisine here. It’s all at your beck and call, too. Take a daytrip to Martha's Vineyard or Nantucket; try a fried-oyster slider at a top-notch seaside restaurant; or whale-watch on a speedy catamaran. Blue skies are known to stretch for miles in summer. And amazing surf notoriously pounds the white sand and snow in winter. This portion of the state is stunning in every season.

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Come to Central and Western Massachusetts and you’ll find another reason this state is so great. In fact, you’ll roll around in greatness here. There’s perhaps the perfect amount of vineyards. And where there isn’t a winery there’s a historic town beautifully boxed in by farmland. Some notables: the Berkshires with bed-and-breakfasts and spa retreats, the Mohawk Trail with 63 miles of heritage and hiking, and Old Sturbridge Village with country stores, water-powered mills, and blacksmiths all showing you what life was like in the 19th century.

What are you waiting for? All of Massachusetts is glorious. Come pay homage to opulence in Cape Cod or honor history at the Freedom Trail in Boston (2.5 miles of epic American history). Come visit the Salem Witch Museum or eat your way through the North of Boston Seafood Trail; relive the “shot heard ‘round the world” in Lexington and Concord, relax near the craggy coastline of the North Shore. No matter what, you’re bound to have a good time. It’s family-friendly. It’s high-energy. It’s down-to-earth. And it’s all here.

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#6 California: For those with an appetite for everything

Remember when you first saw the ocean? It was bigger than you could’ve imagined. California stirs the very same sentiment. There’s nothing like standing at Half Moon Bay at full morning mist, or catching the energy of Yosemite as the moon rolls into the forest, or getting drenched by sun and crystal-clear waters at Lake Tahoe, or even climbing toward the sky on the 90-year-old Giant Dipper rollercoaster in Santa Cruz. California is full of sights to make you feel small again.

Every traveler with an all-encompassing appetite should consider this state. It has coast. It has mountains. It has amusement parks. It has giant cities known the world over. Robust art scenes dominate in San Francisco and San Diego. Los Angeles’ culinary legacy continues to grow. And the scenes that authors and artists past painted of Big Sur still exist.

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There’s nary a soul who doesn’t know about the power of California: its Hollywood streets, its golden beaches, and its poeticized tracts of land. The Redwoods stand tall. The wineries smooth over. The waves break. California is brilliant.

If you want to see all the above and more in one fast-paced adventure, then drive down coastal Highway 1. It’s a must to head down this stretch of California. In fact, go out of your way to make this happen. Why? Well, let us paint the picture. There are endless streams of clouds covering the sea. Underneath those big whites are cliffs and bridges and mountains and beaches. And while you’re barreling down that quintessential highway, those very same clouds roll far below you making it look like you’re on top of the world. Believe us, other motorists are just as mesmerized.

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Stay tuned for our next blog to see which states made the rest of the lineup!

Topics: Massachusetts, Florida, Virginia, Top 10 States, United States, California, Oregon

The locum guide to architecture, iconic watering holes & the best damn pancakes in California

Posted by Saralynn White

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Our doctors work all over the Land of Milk and Honey and they say there’s no better way to connect with it than by exploring it one step (and bite) at a time. Even native Californians are surprised when they take to the sidewalks and boardwalks on foot.

Step out in golden-gate-bridge-california-united-statesHollywood and you'll also take a step back in time. Sunset Tower, designed in 1929, is an elaborate apartment building from Hollywood’s Golden Age. Its elegant Art Deco styling and dramatic setting on the Sunset Strip—together with its proximity to famous restaurants and nightclubs of the 1930s & ’40s—made it a landmark from the get-go. The likes of Katharine Hepburn, Howard Hughes, John Wayne and Bugsy Siegel once lived here giving it even more commemorative clout.

carbor-with-boats-united-statesAbout 1,000 steps away, you’ll find one of the most spectacular buildings in West Hollywood—The Granville Towers. Built in 1930, this historic French Normandy-style classic is only seven stories high, but the view from the penthouse spans the San Gabriel Mountains, LA's downtown skyline, and even reaches as far as Catalina Island. The spot has hosted an A-list of celebrity residents like Marilyn Monroe and, more recently, Joe Jonas (don't tell your daughters!).

grillled-meat-united-statesI recently read a book that featured characters waxing rhapsodic about flannel cakes (not funnel cakes, flannel cakes). Coincidentally, Musso & Frank's—where the flannel cakes are as legendary as the imbibers who used to hang out here—is just down W Sunset. The renowned back room where iconic L.A. literary figures used to dine is no longer open, but it's still easy to picture William Faulkner or Dorothy Parker here. And while places everywhere claim that poet and author Charles Bukowski drank there, he really did drink at Musso and Frank's. No word on whether he ate the flannel cakes, but the place has been in the same spot since 1934 and it's been in business since 1919.

hotel-at-dawn-florida-united-statesWorking near San Diego? The Gaslamp Quarter is one of the most architecturally significant historic districts in the country. It takes in a walkable 16 ½ city blocks, and over 90 of its buildings are on the National Register of Historic Buildings. You’ll discover buildings by renowned architects like Irving Gill, William Templeton Johnson and the Reid Brothers (who also designed the famous Hotel del Coronado just across the bridge), and eclectic architectural styles ranging from Classical Revival to Spanish to Baroque.

city-skyline-with-flowers-united-statesSan Diego may feel urban, but the crashing waves of the Pacific nearby create a vibe that's quintessential American beach. Hit the boardwalk at Pacific Beach and soak up the three-and-a-half-mile stretch to South Mission Beach. Step off the boardwalk for the best damn pancakes—banana blackberry, strawberry granola and more—at The Mission Restaurant. Or satisfy the inner surfer in you with a rite of passage popular in these parts—a massive breakfast burrito washed down with a mocha (made with real Mexican chocolate) at Kono's Surf Club. The line often snakes out the door and around the corner, but it moves fast and it has the top three elements we look for in a joint: location, location, location.

If you're looking for a California locum tenens assignment, look no further than right here.

Topics: Sunset Tower, Hollywood, The Granville Towers, San Diego, Hotel del Coronado, Musso & Franks, Musso & FranksCalifornia, California

Southern California: The happiest place to locum

Posted by Saralynn White

Locum dreams really can come true in Southern California. If you're immune to the magic of Disneyland, or just prefer your excursions without wall-to-wall people then here are some lesser-known, yet worthy spots to indulge your California dreamin'.

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Jalama Beach. Donated to the County of Santa Barbara by the Chumash Indians in 1943, Jalama Beach is not your typical SoCal seaside park. Bring your surfboard, windsurfing board, kite board or kayak; this remote coastline boasts the most consistent surf around. Then, relax and savor the rustic beachfront camping but do not leave without hitting the beach grill for a Jalama Burger and Aunt Ruth’s Raw Apple Cake.

Hernandez Hideaway. It’s arguable, but this hole-in-the-wall watering hole claims to be the inventor of the Margarita. Whether you like it frozen or on the rocks, with salt or sin sal, this Mexican eatery has been a San Diego North County haunt since 1972. Hidden near Lake Hodges, the building was once a stage coach stop; it was also rumored to have been a brothel. Either way, you can still revel in the original architecture and Mexican fare accompanied by potent margaritas (you’ve been warned).



Devil's Punchbowl. Some good things do come from earthquakes and the proof is in the pudding right here. With a little help from run-off water from the San Gabriel Mountains, earthquakes created this beautiful County Park. Bring the family and your hiking boots. Three trails cater to every hiker—from the easy, 1/3 mile Pinyon Pathway Trail to the 7-1/2 mile Devil’s Chair round-trip trek. Somewhere in the middle, you’ll find the mile-long Loop Trail: it’s short, but it drops 300 feet and while going down is fairly easy, you do have to go back up again.

San Andreas Fault Line Tours. Southern Californians are well aware of the impending "big one," but few know they can take a guided tour of the "mega-fault." And for earthquake freaks, the best place in the world to experience an active fault line is south of Palm Springs in a small stretch called Box Canyon. Elite Land Tours will get you up close and personal on a four-hour tour and desert safari that promises glimpses of mountain lions, vultures, roadrunners and huge chuckwalla lizards. You may even feel the earth move under your feet. 

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Sprinkles Cupcake Bakery. Believe it or not, there is such a thing as authenticity in Beverly Hills and you’ll find it at Sprinkles. In a city known for fakery and celebrity, this bakery has earned real world fame and you’ll know it when you bite into a chocolate marshmallow or coconut cupcake. And we dare you to resist the red velvet straight from the oven. You might say this "cakery" is the sprinkles on top of a Southern California adventure.
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The Channel Islands. The least visited National Park in the country, these islands are likely to leave the biggest impression on you. Five of the eight islands in this archipelago comprise the Park, which snakes from 12 to 45 miles (19 to 72 kilometers) off of the coast. The two inner islands, Anacapa and Santa Cruz, are closest to the mainland and easy to reach on scheduled boat trips. The three outer islands, Santa Rosa, Santa Barbara and San Miguel, can be difficult to get to—boat service is infrequent and subject to mercurial weather and sea conditions. The adventure quotient is high, but a trip to any island in the Park is not to be missed. 

Topics: Hernandez Hideaway, Disneyland, San Andreas Fault Line Tours, Jalama Beach, Southern California, Locum Tenens, United States, California

Slow down and locum in the prune-popping, hippie-loving California Sutter Buttes

Posted by Jesse Black

11613617 lAlong a gravel road in the Sutter Butte mountain range of Northern California, nestled between an arching hillside and a babbling brook, stands a sign that reads, "Time to Slow Down."

The sign pays homage to a bygone era when Johnson was in the White House,
tie-dye was all the rage and free love was, well, free. The lone road ends at the Wilbur Hot Springs, a turn-of-the-century hotel and spa resort. There you can soak in the restorative powers of several mineral springs that are ideal for unwinding, destressing and restoring your chi.

The resort embodies a simpler time - no TV's, no internet, and no cell phones. Instead, you'll find therapeutic, mineral-water-filled flumes surrounded by sun-drenched redwood decks just ripe for basking. More decks are perched on a hillside in the distance, and hiking trails, littered with footprints from hippies past, traverse the rambling hills of brown grass that seem to whisper, "relax."

prunes-california-usaFrom the communal kitchen you can assist in preparing fresh sun-dried prunes, which were grown and cultivated only a few miles from the hot springs. Dried plums, as they are more commonly referred to in the region, are a staple here in the home of the largest dried fruit processing plant in the world. And prunes aren't the only "sun sweet" treat in the region: there are so many fruit stands sprinkled throughout the area that locals have to publish a map.

river-landscape-trees-california-usaFollow the fruit stands towards the rising sun to the Sierra Nevada Foothills and visit the South Fork of the Yuba River. Colorful flowers cling to steep cliffs carved by mountain snow melt and the springtime aroma is intoxicating. Well-maintained hiking trails can be reached by crossing a rainbow-arch style footpath that looks like it's always been there. Trails extend up river-like arteries leading to hidden swimming holes, and inspirational views make you feel at one with Mother Nature.

The region lends itself to unforgettable weekend getaways or extended locum stays. You're cordially invited to remove your shoes, turn-off your cell phone, and turn on, tune in and drop in - to Northern California.

Topics: Locum Tenens, United States, Sutter Butte Mountains, California, Wilbur Hot Springs

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Twice a month, our inquisitive locum tenens community asks us to tackle topics ranging from cuisine and culture to recreation and entertainment. We also include great storytelling from our doctors. Have a topic you’d like to read about? Let us know.

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