Locums for a Small World Blog

Top 5 U.S. states to work locum tenens jobs

Posted by Kari Redfield

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Explore the country, contributing your valuable medical skills where they’re most needed — while earning good money. That’s all possible with locum tenens. Right now, we have openings all across the U.S.

Some physicians choose to do locum tenens full-time, in order to gain work/life balance, spend time with family, and choose their own hours. Other physicians take on occasional locums work in order to travel to their bucket list destinations. Isn’t it time that you did something for yourself? Went someplace new? Tried something different?

Why not line up an assignment — and explore while you’re there? Oh, and did we mention the perks? In most cases, we pay for your airline flights, housing, and malpractice insurance. We’ll help you through the licensing and credentialing processes. Plus, wherever you go, you’ll be adding to your CV while helping people where you’re needed and appreciated.

Not sure where to go? Here are the five top states to explore:

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  1. California: Sea to mountains, city to country, and everything in between!

One of our regular locums physicians likes to visit Santa Barbara in order to take on some locum tenens shifts, to see friends, and to enjoy the sights and food. Many other locum tenens doctors choose to take assignments in iconic California, too. And why not? In California, you can explore wine country; walk through Hollywood; and visit Yosemite, the Redwoods, Joshua Tree, Lake Tahoe, and all of the other wild wonders. From city life to remote mountains to beautiful beachside sunsets to all kinds of entertainment, California has variety and splendor for everyone.

Ready to go on your own Californian adventure and get paid for it? Contact us today, as a permanent California license takes about 16 weeks to secure. We’ll help you through it, and typically cover the cost.

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  1. Massachusetts: History, beer, sports, water — and more!

There’s so much to do in Massachusetts, from the famous Massachusetts Whale Trail — which links nearly 40 museums, attractions, whale watching excursions, historic sites, and tours — to the legendary sites in Boston, to a replica of the original Mayflower boat, to the wonders of Cape Cod and Nantucket. And there’s crabbing, clamming, fishing — and so much more! Food, brew pubs, arts, theater, sports, and many activities captivate tourists and locals alike.

Western Massachusetts is beautiful, full of lush green hills in the Berkshires, to the dazzling foliage along the Mohawk Trail, America’s first scenic road drive (and yes, you can hike through the forest there, too). Hike and bike this side of the state — or go on a local food tour via the quant bed-and-breakfasts and spas.

Oh, and who wouldn’t want to enjoy New England’s dazzling colors in fall? And don’t forget the 14,000 acres of active cranberry bogs. 

Sound fun? Get started, as generally, licensing takes 16 weeks, so contact us today if you’re interested, and we’ll help you through the process.

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  1. North Carolina: Mountains, valleys, and sea

North Carolina has mountains, valleys, and miles of seashore. Whether you’re looking for an urban retreat, or something off the beaten path for all kinds of recreational adventure (from fishing, hot air ballooning, sky diving, hiking, biking, skiing, golf, rock climbing, and more), you can find it in North Carolina. Visit eclectic cafes and breweries, moonshine distilleries, vineyards, historic landmarks, museums about the Wright brothers and their famous Kitty Hawk and so many other historical eras — and lots more.

As the locals say, “North Carolina has long been associated with sweet tea, NASCAR and the Duke-Chapel Hill basketball rivalry.” All true, but there’s much more too.

Licensing takes about six weeks, so get started with us today.

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  1. Minnesota: They call it ‘Minnesota nice’ for a reason

Minnesota boasts more than 10,000 natural glacial lakes and is perhaps the origins of politeness, with down-to-Earth people who know how to work hard and express their gratitude. If you like nature, water, and water sports (from top-notch fishing lakes to water skiing), then be sure to visit. With so many lakes and rivers, Minnesota has more miles of shoreline than California, Florida, and Hawaii combined.

The Twin Cities (the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area) features culture galore, including numerous museums, more than 120 theater companies, tons of local music, and good food. With so many parks and green space, you can bike from one side of Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area to the other on bike paths with nary leaving greenspace.

Southwestern Minnesota features prairie land, quiet spaces, and simple, uber affordable living. Northern Minnesota, is the land of lakes and forests, with Duluth acting as the gateway to Lake Superior, which is so big that all the other Great Lakes combined could fit into it, with waves sometimes as tall as 40 feet.

Licensing in Minnesota can take about six weeks, so reach out to us today!

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  1. Michigan: The Great Lake State, industry central, and Motown

From Mackinac Island, where no cars are allowed, to the origins of American industry, to jumping off into adventure on any of the four Great Lakes, Michigan has a lot to offer. Uniquely, no matter where you are in Michigan, you’re always within 85 miles of one of the Great Lakes’ shorelines. The Upper Peninsula is known for rugged living, splendid wildlife, numerous lakes, and nature. It’s a must-see at least once in a lifetime and the perfect spot for any type of outdoor adventure. In the Lower Peninsula, visit museums to see the birthplace of modern industry, explore the roots of Motown, dine on fine or fun food, see live music, and go to festivals, farmers markets, and more.

As the locals say it, “Whether you are an urban adventurer or an outdoor enthusiast, a foodie or a thrill-seeker, traveling with your family or making memories with friends — you are on the brink of planning a vacation so unique, it can only be classified as Pure Michigan.”

Plan around six weeks to get your license. Contact us today!

Get started on your adventure

Ready to explore your own locum tenens adventure? Ready to treat yourself to some travel? Click the button below to browse our current openings, or give us a call at 1.800.760.3174.

Search our current physician opportunities

Topics: benefits of locum tenens, locum tenens lifestyle, travel, Locum Tenens, work life balance, United States, michigan, California, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Minnesota

Global Medical's top 10 states for locum tenens doctors to explore in 2016 (pt. 2)

Posted by Everett Fitch

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2016, for you, should be a year of new experiences. It should be full of long hikes and aging under the sun with those close to you. Endless white lines dotting the road should be your compass from time to time. Looking down in awe from your airplane window at waves breaking and clouds rolling in over mountains should be an experience you start planning right away. When whatever type of landscape or cityscape you’re most captivated by calls to you this year, you should go.

We’re sure you’ll find some form of serenity in one of the destinations below. 

No more delaying: here’s part two of our Top 10 States to Explore in 2016 list.

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#5: West Virginia - John Denver was right. This place is "almost heaven."

We're willing to bet you've never seen rolling hills and unbroken mountains greener than the ones housed in West Virginia. In fact, we're positive - because if you have and you’re a lover of outdoor adventure then you wouldn’t have ever left these boundaries.

Why are we so emphatic? Well, because these very hills and mountains are the life-blood of this state; they provide the backdrop for every adventure, little or big. They’re right there in the background while you cliff-dive at Summersville Lake in central WV. They're jutting over while you fine dine at Market Vines Grill and Wine Bar in Wheeling. And they're your front-and-center focus while you whitewater raft down one of the oldest rivers (ironically named New River) on the continent.

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That’s right, welcome to the wild and wonderful world of West Virginia. The aptly named Mountain State is known as the outdoor recreation capital of the east. Many DC residents venture here on weekends and holidays and we can understand why. It has more rushing rivers, winding trails, snow-drenched ski resorts (Snowshoe Mountain), deep caverns, wild forestland (Monongahela National Forest) and fishing lakes within its borders than any of its neighbors. Not to mention there are amusement parks (Camden Park), spa towns (Greenbrier), museums, farmers' markets and art crawls galore. It doesn't matter if you're an athlete or an urbanite, we guarantee you’ll immediately fall in love with any portion of this heavenly state.

We realized we could’ve taken the easy route and just posted every last lyric from John Denver’s classic love song for West Virginia - “Take Me Home Country Roads” - but then we would’ve been deprived of the joy that comes from professing our own love. Hopefully our words were just as potent as JD’s, you know, enough to convince you to drop what you’re doing and take a locum tenens assignment in ol’ West Virginia right now.

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#4: South Carolina - A time-warp of quiet, oak-lined streets and raucous silvery beaches


Take a minute to describe your perfect day. We're willing to bet every last thing you listed can be found in South Carolina. If your solace can only be found high up in the mountains then venture to the bluest and largest of lakes, Lake Jocassee. If your happiness depends on crashing waves and amusement parks then stay put in the Southeast's most famous and raucous beach town, Myrtle Beach. Or if you’re looking for more of an island getaway then try Hilton Head, Kiawah or Seabrooke.

East to west, South Carolina’s landscape is a gorgeous climb: it starts with glinting Atlantic beaches, rises up to the Piedmont, and then settles high in the Blue Ridge Mountains. It's simply a stunning place. We weren't the first to figure that out though. Notable socialites such as the Goodyears and the Vanderbilts realized the potential of SC long ago. They partied hard and indulged in all the beautiful weather this green land has to offer.

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Author Pat Conroy is just as enamored with South Carolina. He pens his love often and we know why. The lush south is full of Spanish moss-draped cypress and gum trees. It exists in a time-warp of quiet, oak-lined streets and beaches where kids learn to "pick a blue crab clean." Small-town charm like this endures all across this state - and with a history that dates back to pre-revolutionary war that's saying a lot.

Then there are bigger cities like Columbia - the graceful capital with brilliant botanical gardens, history-rich state museums, and the 50,000-acre playground known as Lake Murray. If you want something with a little more shoreline, go coastal, all the way to Charleston. This city’s history is as captivating as its silvery sands. It has been burnt, buried, and marched on, plus weathered many-a-storm. Still, it has graciously incorporated its battle-torn past (i.e., Civil War) into its tourist-treasure present. Visit South Carolina for a uniquely rich experience.

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#3: Alaska - The Land of the Midnight Sun

There are places so incredible that when you visit them the only thing you're thinking is how can I live hereAlaska is one of those places. It screams epic from mountain to coast. Here, waves crash against glaciers. Glaciers crash against mountains. Mountains crash against sky. And people you can't call anything but salt of the earth call its vast expanse home.

Drifters, dreamers and pioneers populate this wild unknown. They’ve been drawn to these shores where nature and culture are inextricable. They’ve found miles of labyrinthine forest and tundra; golden towns filled with onion-domed churches left over from Russian settlers; groves marked with native totem poles; and swells of wildlife dancing around boomtown architecture.

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Yeah, you'll find it all in Alaska. Watch herds of caribou storm in the shadow of Mt. Denali. Experience summer’s midnight sun on Flattop Mountain. Or see winter’s Northern Lights with the best front-row seats, Chena Hot Springs. This place fills your lungs with air so crisp it’ll feel like your first breath - something those of us in the “Lower 48” can’t appreciate until we experience it firsthand.

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#2: North Carolina: Mountains of natural beauty and the rest is history

North Carolina has a history of making history. Over thirty years before the Pilgrims made it to America, a group of English explorers claimed Roanoke Island as their home. Centuries later, two famous brothers, the Wrights, launched the first ever powered flight in the town of Kitty Hawk. Fast-forward a few decades and you’ve got Greensboro at the helm of the Civil Rights movement. We bet you could step foot anywhere and kick up dirt left over from the birth of this country.

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It’s easy to see why so many settled here. People of Scots-Irish descent to Moravians to Cherokees saw trails to be blazed. And North Carolina - today - wouldn't be the same without them. Grandfather Mountain holds the Highland Games’ Scottish festival every year. Historic Salem illuminates a living history of Moravian architecture and cuisine. And Native Americans are honored in the “land of the blue mist” (AKA Smoky Mountains) through exhibits, museums and historic paths.

Everywhere from mountain to piedmont to coast you’ll see the East’s biggest ski resorts; the South’s most famed golf courses; and the country’s tallest lighthouses. This state’s history and natural beauty will awe you in its every crashing wave and cobblestone street.

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#1: Texas - Shine on in this big-and-bright state

Texans are proud. Why shouldn't they be? They've got a sky that won't quit and a world of contrasting country that respectfully puts other states to shame. It just feels like home everywhere, no matter if you're in the Panhandle Plains or along the Gulf Coast.

Texas is always redefining itself. True, Old West heritage still reigns and if you look up to the night sky you’ll see that big bright diamond canopy this state is known for, but things are changing. Houston is more cultural and culinary than it’s ever been with new galleries and gastronomic experiences. Austin is tramping ever-forward as the Live Music Capital of the World. And gone is the sports-only reputation of Dallas: welcome to an architectural wonderland known for its thrilling nightlife.

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Remember, Texas is big. The roads here are arteries that give life to epic trips across massive land. If you’re ever tired of city, then find a beach in Corpus Christi. If you’re ever tired of coastline, then head to Big Bend National Park in Far West Texas. This state has it all.

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Did you miss part one of our Top 10 states for locum tenens doctors to explore in 2016 list? You can find it here. If you want to dive right in and see what opportunities are available now, just click the button below.


Search current physician openings

 

Topics: Texas, Alaska, North Carolina, United States, South Carolina, West Virginia, Top 10 States 2016

My locum adventures 'beyond the black stump'

Posted by Saralynn White

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Written by Carville Tolson, MD


G'day, y'all!

There's an interesting greeting—it reminds me of where I am and where I'm from.
 
Anyway, I've been here in Australia 'beyond the black stump' (far out in the bush) for a month now. It really is a nice place. Not flashy or fancy, mind you, but it's a real nice place. Quiet, too...for the most part. It's a long way from anything, to be surethat MUST have something to do with the quietness.

Clinic practice is good. One has to be a bit innovative at times because we don't have all the medicines in stock, which are sometimes indicated or required. But that doesn't happen very often, and we can get them in about a week or less.

One man has COAD (that's COPD or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the States) and he was barely holding his own with his current treatments. I don't consider that I'm a high-powered doc, but I knew a medicine which could help, and though it had already prescribed, I learned that he wasn't taking it. Compliance is a big problem among Aboriginals (and elsewhere), and usually GP's here just shrug their shoulders and say, "Well, what can you do?" I wasn't satisfied with that.

I explained to this man how I had seen amazing benefits with the use of Spiriva for my patients with the same problems back in the USA. I explained that it may not help much in the first few days or even in the first week, but that long-term it would probably help a lot. Don't you know, he started to use it every day and two weeks later he looked much better and admitted he felt better! I guess us GP blokes from the USA can do some good after all.

Compliance issues were introduced as a factor in deciding on the treatment plan. When kids come in with head sores, usually I would just tell them to wash the head daily, give an oral antibiotic, perhaps a cream, and have them come back to check them in a week. But not so, I quickly learned (from the GP who was soon to leave) that parents seldom give oral meds to their kids beyond the first day or two; mandatory washing of the hair is unlikely to happen at all; and parents forget to come back in a week.

So, the best way to treat this is to give the kid an injection of LA Bacillin, which is a long-acting antibiotic, but which also is no fun to get. And yep! It goes in the bum. With my mobility problems, I rely on the parents to catch the little kids, and into the butt it goes!! This is NOT the part that I enjoy - giving shots to kids. But the medicine works!! The next time they come in, though, the child stands in a corner and eyes me suspiciously, even if he or she isn't the patient. But they do warm up to me (it seems) when they hear that brother or sister or cousin is going to get a shot. Then they come right over to me...and help with holding down the next "victim" for his shot. They're such a big help. Of course, all the children present get an "icy popsicle" treatwhich is pretty much like frozen Gatorade.

Of the patients who come in, 90% (+) wear no shoes. A young boy, about 5 years of age, had injured his foot which had the potential to get infected, but it only needed a Band-Aid to cover it. When I told his mum and dad that he needed to wear shoes for the next week you would have thought I was giving him a shot! He cried and cried and cried. Okay, so GP docs from the USA can be terribly mean.

Right now the weather is very mild. It does get down to 40 or 45 degrees Fahrenheit, but that's only at night. During the daytime, it gets up to 75 or 80. So, you can see it's really great.

About 10 days ago, the temporary nurse working here offered to take me out on a road trip. We went up to see Devil's Marbles and The Policeman's Waterhole. It was a great day. Weather was perfect. I rode with my window down most of the way. We each took hundreds of picturesthank you digital technology.

We traveled 600-700 km (375-430 mi) that day. No big deal, but remember, the roads were all dirt roads. At the start I thought, "How primitive this is." After we had finished making the circuit (12+ hrs), coming through a mountain range toward the end, crossing several dry creek beds, passing through narrow openings in the rocks, riding on washboard-textured roads, averaging 20-30 km/hr (15-20 mph) over 160 km (100 mi), and then coming back to the part of the road where we had started, I then realized how GREAT the starting road really was! It was like a grand highway. I just needed a bit of a better perspective, is all.

At the end, a lady looked at me and said, "You look tired." No kidding. "And your hair is red on the left." What?!!! Sure enough, I looked in the mirror and it was. When I washed my hair, there was red muddy water from all the dust. I hadn't realized I had been exposed to that much dust. Hmmm. Wonder if it helps the hair? Might be therapeutic.

carville-tolson-md-northern-territory-australia I'm really glad to be working here. The people are good people and they have needs. I try to teach them about preventive measures, how to keep from getting sick, and how to treat some problems simply. I've purchased some vitamins and give these to them with good success. They appreciate what is done. It makes me glad to be here.

Dr. Carville Tolson is a GP from North Carolina, USA, who's taken a few locum assignments with Global Medical. He's enjoying his experience in Australia's Northern Territory so much he may never return to the states!

Topics: Dr. Carville Tolson, North Carolina, Aboriginal Indigenous People, Locum Tenens, Australia, United States

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Twice a month, our inquisitive locum tenens community asks us to tackle topics ranging from cuisine and culture to recreation and entertainment. We also include great storytelling from our doctors. Have a topic you’d like to read about? Let us know.

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